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Glossary

Common Marketing Terms for your Web Marketing Vocabulary

If you’re asking yourself, what is search engine optimization (SEO), you’ve come to the right place.  Before you can start optimizing your website, your web marketing vocabulary should have a basic understanding of marketing terms.  So, let’s get started:

Web Marketing Terms:

Alt tag
This attribute tag tells the browser to display some text when it can not show the image. Some of the search engines read the keywords in these tags to rank a site in their index. They are viewable when your cursor is placed over the graphic.

Banner
A banner is an advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs across a Web page or is positioned in a margin or other space reserved for ads. Banner ads are usually Graphics Interchange Format images.

In addition to adhering to size, many Web sites limit the size of the file to a certain number of bytes so that the file will display quickly. Most ads are animated GIF since animation has been shown to attract a larger percentage of user clicks. The most common larger banner ad is 468 pixel wide by 60 pixels high. Smaller sizes include 125 by 125 and 120 by 90 pixels. These and other banner sizes have been established as standard sizes by the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB).

Bridge Page
HTML pages designed specifically to rank highly on search engine results for a particular search engine and a particular phrase or keyword. Their high rank on search results gets them found and noticed by large numbers of search engine users. They then redirect this traffic volume to your main site.

Browser
An application program that interprets HTML and presents the final web page. Used to surf the web. Examples include: Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator and Mosaic.

Doorway Page
HTML pages designed specifically to rank highly on search engine results for a particular search engine and a particular phrase or keyword. Their high rank on search results gets them found and noticed by large numbers of search engine users. They then redirect this traffic volume to your main site.

Flash
Flash is a popular Web animation format developed by Macromedia. If you have ever drummed your fingers impatiently while waiting for a Web page’s intro movie to load, or clicked “Skip Intro” as quickly as you could find the link, then you have probably experienced Flash.

Unlike human beings, search engine spiders never click “Skip Intro”, because search engine spiders cannot see that link. In fact, search engines cannot read anything in Flash. Any text, links, or images appearing within Flash will be invisible to search engines.

Frames
This term has many different uses but by far the most frequently used is in relation to web pages where the web page being viewed has a number of independent boxes or frames. A common application of this is with a search engine where in the left-hand frame you enter the information you want to be searched & the results of this search are presented back in the right-hand frame.

Frames hurt search engine exposure due to the complexity of the programming involved. Most major search engines can index pages in frames. However, they will index each frame as a separate page, causing bits and pieces of the page to show up separately in the index.

FTP
Abbreviation of File Transfer Protocol, the protocol used on the Internet for sending files.

GIF File
Graphics Interchange Format, the most common type of image file used on the internet. These files are compressed so they take up the minimum amount of space & can therefore be downloaded a lot quicker than other graphics files. GIF files are typically used for: backgrounds, displaying banners, advertisements and buttons.

Header Tag
The header tags are used for section headings. They are usually rendered in large, bold letters and placed on its own line. <H1> is the largest and <H6> is the smallest.

Homepage
The main or opening page of a web site, which is often referred to as index.html or default.html, if running on a Windows NT server.

Host
A computer system that is the source of network services; also the site where you can hold an interactive session. Your hosting company is the company that houses your web page on their computer so this is viewable on the internet.

HTML
Short for HyperText Markup Language, the authoring language used to create documents on the World Wide Web. This is the programming that web browsers read behind your web site. The meta tags that search engines crawl and index your site with are all written in this programming language.

HTTP
HyperText Transfer Protocol, the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web. HTTP defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. For example, when you enter a URL in your browser, this actually sends an HTTP command to the Web server directing it to fetch and transmit the requested web page.

Hub
A network term used for any device to which several others are attached, providing a common point of connection to all other devices in the network.

Hypertext
Text that you can click on to take you to a linked page. Often underlined and can also be a different color than regular text on page, especially if you have clicked on it.

Informational Page
HTML pages designed specifically to rank highly on search engine results for a particular search engine and a particular phrase or keyword. Their high rank on search results gets them found and noticed by large numbers of search engine users. They then redirect this traffic volume to your main site.

Inside Page(s)
All pages within the web site except for the homepage.

Inventory
The number of banner ad impressions delivered via an ad space during a given period.  The total number of ad views or impressions that a Web site has to sell over a given period of time (usually, inventory is figured by the month).

Javascript
Search engine ranking algorithms weight text most that appears at the top of a page (and, in some cases, also text that appears at the bottom of a page).

Large quantities of JavaScript on the top of a page will push a page’s text down to where the algorithms will give it less weight.

Maximize
Targeting heavily a keyword within the meta support-including the meta, graphics, alt tags, domain name, hypertext links and text. Utilizing techniques to rank a page under a specific set of keywords, and to make a web site as search-engine friendly as possible.

Newsgroups
Newsgroups are a collection of information and users who get together to communicate about one particular subject, a good example would be www.dejanews.com.

Off-line Advertising
Off-line advertising is a traditional means of advertising that are outside of the internet (i.e. commercials, print ads, stationary, business cards etc.) We of course recommend all our clients to do off-line marketing.

Position report
A report we run using software to determine a page or site’s ranking or statistics on the search engines.

Psychographics
Subjective information about a population of Web viewers, such as propensity towards sports, arts or business. Includes personality characteristics.

Server
A computer (or service) that provides information or service to other computers on a network. Your server is also the name of a particular computer out of many from a hosting company that your web site is hosted with.

Site Consultation
This is the review and recommendations given by a SEM company to make your web site easier to navigate for the user and making it search engine friendly for better rankings.

Tag
A term used within HTML tags are codes that tell the web browser exactly how to display information, for example there is a tag to display text in bold.

Before we can talk about SEO, we have to answer the question:

What is internet marketing?
When you think of marketing, or advertising, the traditional means are things like billboard ads, television ads, newspaper ads, and so on.  Internet marketing doesn’t uses the internet to reach an targeted audience with things like search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO), banner ads, email marketing, etc.  In North America alone in 2009, about 76% of the population uses the internet on a regular basis.  What this means is that the internet has created a global marketplace were people can order products from anywhere in the world at any time.  Internet marketing is relatively inexpensive compared to traditional marketing.  A small company can reach a very wide audience for relatively low cost; which potentially means a very high and long term return on invests.

So, what is search engine optimization (SEO)?
SEO is the process of driving traffic to a website or a specific webpage via search engines.  This is generally done through unpaid, organic, search results.  Typically when talking about paid search results, it is in reference to search engine marketing.  When someone types a term in to a search engine, the search engine results pages list websites that are related to the search.  The goal of search engine optimization is to get your website to be on the first page of the results.

Search Engine Marketing Terms:

Dynamic Page Generation
Most search engines will not index pages that have URLs containing any of the following characters: ?, =, &, %, +, $. Google’s spider currently will include such links in its index, but it will not follow any links that those pages contain. Depending upon a site’s back-end software, workarounds for this problem may be available.

Eye Tracking
Eye tracking is a technique used in cognitive science, psychology (notably psycholinguistics), human-computer interaction (HCI), advertising, medical research, and other areas. A camera focuses on one or both eyes and records their movement as the viewer looks at some kind of stimulus.

Most modern eye-trackers use contrast to locate the center of the pupil and use infrared beams to create a corneal reflection, and the triangulation of both to determine the fixation point. Eye movements are typically divided into fixations and saccades, when the eye gaze pauses in a certain position, and when it moves to another position, respectively. The resulting series of fixations and saccades is called a scanpath. Most information from the eye is made available during a fixation, but not during a saccade. The locations of fixations along a scanpath show what information loci on the stimulus were processed during an eye tracking session.

B Line Marketing offers custom eye tracking studies to help you determine how your target audience ‘sees’ your web site and what areas are not being seen. Knowing this helps decipher which part of a web site needs work to help drive conversions or leads.

Internet Marketing
The promotion and advertising of web sites.

Keyword
A keyword is a one, two or three word combination or phrase a customer would enter in a search engine to find a product or service.

Keyword Frequency
For a page to rank highly for a given keyword, that keyword must appear with appropriate frequency in the page’s plain text content and in the text of names given to links on the page. The keyword needs to appear frequently on the page, but not unnaturally frequently, lest the page be blacklisted for “word stacking” (also known as “spamming the index”).

Keyword Placement
If a Web site does not strategically place keywords within the title tag, meta tags, HTML headings, and the first paragraph within the page’s body, the Web site will not rank highly for those keyword phrases.

Meta or Meta Tags
Hidden programming tags to maximize your web site to the search engines.

For the more technically advanced – Describes the content of the document in which they’re written. Meta tags have two possible attributes: <META HTTP-EQUIV=”name”CONTENT=”content”> and <META NAME=”name” CONTENT=”content”>

Meta tags with an HTTP-EQUIV attribute are analogous to HTTP headers that can control the action of browsers.

Meta tags with a NAME attribute are used primarily by indexing and searching tools. These tools can gather meta information in order to sort and classify Web pages. One way to help your document show up more frequently in search engines and directories is to use the META NAME attribute to set keywords that will pull up your site when someone does a search for those words. Some search engines rank web sites mostly from meta, others do not consider meta for rankings but rather as the description which shows if your web site ranks.

Meta tags are hidden and the only way to view them is to look at the source code of a web page. This can be done in many types of browsers by going to view, source or page source. Meta tags should always be at the top on the programming under the <HTML> tag and right after the first <HEAD> tag. Then meta should always go in this order:

<HTML>
<HEAD>
title meta tag
keyword meta tag
description meta tag
</HEAD> – ending head tag

No other programming should go before the title tag, keyword tag or description tag.

There should always be an ending head tag. Sometimes Java is viewable between these tags that is okay as long as it is not before the title, keywords or description tags.

Meta Support
Meta support is the HTML support required for the web designer to implement into the web page design to maximize the web site for the search engines. This includes meta, graphics, alt tags, domain name, hypertext links and text in the proper order and placement on a page.

Ranking
The position for a particular keyword on a search engine. For example typing in a search engine for “blue widgets” will yield a number mostly the top 10 web sites that fit this word for relevancy, being in the first page or top 10 can bring tons of visitors for your web site that found you through a particular keyword.

Reach
The number of viewers exposed to an ad on the Web.

ROI
ROI (return on investment) is “the bottom line” on how successful an ad or campaign was in terms of what the returns (generally sales revenue) were for the money expended (invested).

RON
A run-of-network ad is one that is placed to run on all sites within a given network of sites. Ad sales firms such as Latitude90 handle run-of-network insertion orders in such a way as to optimize results for the buyer consistent with higher priority ad commitments.

ROS
A run-of-site ad is one that is placed to rotate on all non-featured ad spaces on a site. CPM rates for run-of-site ads are usually less than for rates for specially- placed ads or sponsorships.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM)
A combination of search engine optimization (SEO), paid placement programs and pay-per-click advertising.

Search engine marketing is used to gain prominent placement on a search results page for a company’s products and services either through optimization services or paid advertising.

Utilizing the latest technologies, B Line Marketing educates, updates, submits, monitors and adjusts your online marketing to assure the best possible sales, conversion and traffic numbers.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the process of increasing the amount of visitors to a web site by ranking them high in on the search engine results page.

Optimization includes designing, writing, and coding (in HTML) your entire web site so that there is a good chance that your web pages will appear at the top of search engine queries for your selected keywords and key phrases.

The higher the web site ranks, the greater the exposure and chance that the site will be visited by a user. Generally the visitor clicking on the listings is more qualified because they search for what they want, when they want it.

Targeting
Targeting is purchasing ad space on Web sites that match audience and campaign objective requirements.

Demographics
Demographics is data about the size and characteristics of a population or audience (for example, gender, age group, income group, purchasing history, personal preferences, and so forth).

Text Embedded in Graphics
Search engines cannot read text that is inside an image. For example, corporate logos on Web pages usually are graphics, and the company name inside that logo will be invisible to search engines. Furthermore, search engines place considerable weight on the text associated with hyperlinks; if that text is in the form of a graphical “button”, search engines will not see it.

Unique Visitor
A unique visitor is someone with a unique address who is entering a Web site for the first time that day (or some other specified period). Thus, a visitor that returns within the same day is not counted twice.

A unique visitors count tells you how many different people there are in your audience during the time period, but not how much they used the site during the period.

URL
Abbreviation of Uniform Resource Locator, the global address of documents and other resources on the World Wide Web. A URL is a web site’s address.

The first part of the address indicates what protocol to use, and the second part specifies the IP address or the domain name where the resource is located. For example, the two URLs below point to two different files at the domain pcwebopedia.com. The first specifies an executable file that should be fetched using the FTP protocol; the second specifies a Web page that should be fetched using the HTTP protocol.

User Session
A user session is someone with a unique address that enters or reenters a Web site each day (or some other specified period).

A user session is sometimes determined by counting only those users that haven’t reentered the site within the past 20 minutes or a similar period. User session figures are sometimes used, somewhat incorrectly, to indicate “visits” or “visitors” per day.

User sessions are a better indicator of total site activity than “unique visitors” since they indicate frequency of use.

View
A visit is a Web user with a unique address entering a Web site at some page for the first time that day (or for the first time in a lesser time period).

The number of visits is roughly equivalent to the number of different people that visit a site. This term is ambiguous unless the user defines it, since it could mean a user session or it could mean a unique visitor that day.

Visit
A visit is a Web user with a unique address entering a Web site at some page for the first time that day (or for the first time in a lesser time period).

The number of visits is roughly equivalent to the number of different people that visit a site. This term is ambiguous unless the user defines it, since it could mean a user session or it could mean a unique visitor that day.

What is the best search engine optimization (SEO) practice?
The best search engine optimization practices are the ones that focus on the long term.  We usually tell our clients that a year commitment is the best at minimum.  While you will definitely see marked improvements in your website and its performance, SEO efforts have a high return on investment meaning that you will continue to reap the rewards as time goes on.  There are always new ways to improve and implement SEO strategies, but the basics like keyword-rich meta and on-page content do not need to be updated very often if they are done well the first time.

Banner Advertising and Web Site Analytic Terms:

Ad
For Web advertising, an ad is almost always a banner, a graphic image of a designated pixel size and byte size limit. It is usually animated GIF. An ad or set of ads for a campaign is often referred to as “the creative.”

Banners and other special advertising that include an interactive or visual element beyond the usual are known as rich media.

Ad Rotation
Ads are often rotated into ad spaces from a list. This is usually done automatically by software on the Web site or at a central site administered by an ad broker or server facility for a network of Web sites. For example, Latitude90, a leading ad sales firm, provides an ad serving and tracking service, called adMonitor, for the network of independent sites that it sells impressions and sponsorships for.

Ad Space
An ad space is a space on a Web page that is reserved for ads. An ad space group is a group of spaces within a Web site that share the same characteristics so that an ad purchase can be made for the group of spaces.

Ad View
An ad view, synonymous with ad impression, is a single ad that appears (usually in full view without scrolling) on a Web page when the page arrives at the viewer’s display. Ad views are what most Web sites sell or prefer to sell. A Web page may offer space for a number of ad views. In general, the term impression is more commonly used.

Banner
A banner is an advertisement in the form of a graphic image that typically runs across a Web page or is positioned in a margin or other space reserved for ads. Banner ads are usually Graphics Interchange Format images.

In addition to adhering to size, many Web sites limit the size of the file to a certain number of bytes so that the file will display quickly. Most ads are animated GIF since animation has been shown to attract a larger percentage of user clicks. The most common larger banner ad is 468 pixel wide by 60 pixels high. Smaller sizes include 125 by 125 and 120 by 90 pixels. These and other banner sizes have been established as standard sizes by the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB).

Beyond the Banner
This is the idea that, in addition to banner ads, there are other ways to use the Internet to communicate a marketing message. These include sponsoring a Web site or a particular feature on it; advertising in e-mail newsletters; co-branding with another company and its Web site; contest promotion; and, in general, finding new ways to engage and interact with the desired audience.

“Beyond the banner” approaches can also include the interstitial and streaming video infomercial. The banner itself can be transformed into a small rich media event.

Booked Space
This is the number of ad views for an ad space that are currently sold out.

Brand, Brand Name, and Branding
A brand is a product, service, or concept that is publicly distinguished from other products, services, or concepts so that it can be easily communicated and usually marketed. A brand name is the name of the distinctive product, service, or concept. Branding is the process of creating and disseminating the brand name.

Branding can be applied to the entire corporate identity as well as to individual product and service names. In Web and other media advertising, it is recognized that there is usually some kind of branding value whether or not an immediate, direct response can be measured from an ad or campaign.

Companies like Proctor and Gamble have made a science out of creating and evaluating the success of their brand name products.

Caching
In Internet advertising, the cache of pages in a cache server or the user’s computer means that some ad views won’t be known by the ad counting programs and is a source of concern.

There are several techniques for telling the browser not to cache particular pages. On the other hand, specifying no caching for all pages may mean that users will find your site to be slower than you would like.

Cookie
A cookie is a file on a Web user’s hard drive (it’s kept in one of the subdirectories under the browser file directory) that is used by Web sites to record data about the user. Some ad rotation software uses cookies to see which ad the user has just seen so that a different ad will be rotated into the next page view.

Creative
Ad agencies and buyers often refer to ad banners and other forms of created advertising as “the creative.” Since the creative requires creative inspiration and skill that may come from a third party, it often doesn’t arrive until late in the preparation for a new campaign launch.

FAST
FAST is a coalition of the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB), the ANA, and the ARF that has recommended or is working on guidelines for consumer privacy, ad models and creative formats, audience and ad impression measurement, and a standard reporting template together with a standard insertion order.

FAST originated with Proctor and Gamble’s Future of Advertising Stakeholders Summit in August, 1998. FAST’s first guideline, available in March, 1999, was a guideline on “Basic Advertising Measures.” Our definitions in this list include the FAST definitions for impression and click.

Filtering
Filtering is the immediate analysis by a program of a user request to determine which ad(s) to return in the requested page. A Web page request can tell a Web site or its ad server whether it fits a certain characteristic such as coming from a particular company’s address or that the user is using a particular level of browser. The Web ad server can respond accordingly.

Fold
“Above the fold,” a term borrowed from print media, refers to an ad that is viewable as soon as the Web page arrives. You don’t have to scroll down (or sideways) to see it. Since screen resolution can affect what is immediately viewable, it’s good to know whether the Web site’s audience tends to set their resolution at 640 by 480 pixels or at 800 by 600 (or higher).

Hit
A hit is the sending of a single file whether an HTML file, an image, an audio file, or other file type. Since a single Web page request can bring with it a number of individual files, the number of hits from a site is a not a good indication of its actual use (number of visitors). It does have meaning for the Web site space provider, however, as an indicator of traffic flow.

Impression
According to the “Basic Advertising Measures,” from FAST, an ad industry group, an impression is “The count of a delivered basic advertising unit from an ad distribution point.”

Impressions are how most Web advertising is sold and the cost is quoted in terms of the cost per thousand impressions (CPM).

Insertion Order
An insertion order is a formal, printed order to run an ad campaign.

Typically, the insertion order identifies the campaign name, the Web site receiving the order and the planner or buyer giving the order, the individual ads to be run (or who will provide them), the ad sizes, the campaign beginning and end dates, the CPM, the total cost, discounts to be applied, and reporting requirements and possible penalties or stipulations relative to the failure to deliver the impressions.

Inventory
The number of banner ad impressions delivered via an ad space during a given period.

The total number of ad views or impressions that a Web site has to sell over a given period of time (usually, inventory is figured by the month).

IO
An insertion order is a formal, printed order to run an ad campaign.

Typically, the insertion order identifies the campaign name, the Web site receiving the order and the planner or buyer giving the order, the individual ads to be run (or who will provide them), the ad sizes, the campaign beginning and end dates, the CPM, the total cost, discounts to be applied, and reporting requirements and possible penalties or stipulations relative to the failure to deliver the impressions.

Media Broker
Since it’s often not efficient for an advertiser to select every Web site it wants to put ads on, media brokers aggregate sites for advertisers and their media planners and buyers, based on demographics and other factors.

Media Buyer
A media buyer, usually at an advertising agency, works with a media planner to allocate the money provided for an advertising campaign among specific print or online media (magazines, TV, Web sites, and so forth), and then calls and places the advertising orders.

On the Web, placing the order often includes requesting proposals and negotiating the final cost.

Proof of Performance
Some advertisers may want proof that the ads they’ve bought have actually run and that click-through figures are accurate. In print media, tearsheets taken from a publication prove that an ad was 26 run. On the Web, there is no industry-wide practice for proof of performance.

Some buyers rely on the integrity of the media broker and the Web site. The ad buyer usually checks the Web site to determine the ads are actually running. Most buyers require weekly figures during a campaign. A few want to look directly at the figures, viewing the ad server or Web site reporting tool.

Psychographic Characteristics
This is a term for personal interest information that is gathered by Web sites by requesting it from users. For example, a Web site could ask users to list the Web sites that they visit most often. Advertisers could use this data to help create a demographic profile for that site.

Reporting Template
Although the media have to report data to ad agencies and media planners and buyers during and at the end of each campaign, no standard report is yet available. FAST, the ad industry coalition, is working on proposed standard reporting template that would enable reporting to be consistent.

Rich Media
Rich media is advertising that contains perceptual or interactive elements more elaborate than the usual banner ad. Today, the term is often used for banner ads with popup menus that let the visitor select a particular page to link to on the advertiser’s site.

Rich media ads are generally more challenging to create and to serve. Some early studies have shown that rich media ads tend to be more effective than ordinary animated banner ads.

Run-of-network
A run-of-network ad is one that is placed to run on all sites within a given network of sites. Ad sales firms such as Latitude90 handle run-of-network insertion orders in such a way as to optimize results for the buyer consistent with higher priority ad commitments.

Run-of-site
A run-of-site ad is one that is placed to rotate on all non-featured ad spaces on a site. CPM rates for run-of-site ads are usually less than for rates for specially- placed ads or sponsorships.

Splash Page
A splash page (also known as an interstitial) is a preliminary page that precedes the regular home page of a Web site and usually promotes a particular site feature or provides advertising. A splash page is timed to move on to the home page after a short period of time.

What is digital marketing?
Typically, when talking about digital marketing, it refers to using television, radio, internet, mobile, and any other form of digital media.  But for the most part, digital marketing refers to using the internet.  However, mobile phones are so prolific today and have so many features including internet access that they are becoming another popular forum for digital marketing.

One example of this is the use of Twitter.  The majority of Twitter users do not actually log in to the website, they use various platforms via mobile phones to send and receive Tweets.  Many companies use Twitter as a free digital marketing vehicle, to send out promotional messages and offerings.

Pay-per-Click Advertising Terms:

Bid Management
Managing listings, keywords, and bids.

Bids Shown
The bid amounts displayed while editing keyword bids. A well-designed search engine should display at least the top 5 bids for each keyword.

Click
According to ad industry recommended guidelines from FAST, a click is “when a visitor interacts with an advertisement.” This does not apparently mean simply interacting with a rich media ad, but actually clicking on it so that the visitor is headed toward the advertiser’s destination. (It also does not mean that the visitor actually waits to fully arrive at the destination, but just that the visitor started going there.)

Click Rate (CTR)
The click rate is the percentage of ad views that resulted in clickthroughs. Although there is visibility and branding value in ad views that don’t result in a clickthrough, this value is difficult to measure.

A clickthrough has several values: it’s an indication of the ad’s effectiveness and it results in the viewer getting to the advertiser’s Web site where other messages can be provided. A new approach is for a click to result not in a link to another site but to an immediate product order window. What a successful click rate is depends on a number of factors, such as: the campaign objectives, how enticing the banner message is, how explicit the message is (a message that is complete within the banner may be less apt to be clicked), audience/message matching, how new the banner is, how often it is displayed to the same user, and so forth.

In general, click rates for high-repeat, branding banners vary from 0.15 to 1%. Ads with provocative, mysterious, or other compelling content can induce click rates ranging from 1 to 5% and sometimes higher. The click rate for a given ad tends to diminish with repeated exposure.

Click Stream
A click stream is a recorded path of the pages a user requested in going through one or more Web sites.

Click stream information can help Web site owners understand how visitors are using their site and which pages are getting the most use. It can help advertisers understand how users get to the client’s pages, what pages they look at, and how they go about ordering a product.

Click Through
A click through is generated when a user clicks with their mouse on an advertiser’s message in order to move to the advertiser’s Web site. A click through is often stated as a percentage of page impressions; if 1,000 Internet users view an advertiser’s message, and 60 click on the message to view the advertiser’s information, the click through rate is 6 percent.

Clickthrough
A clickthrough is what is counted by the sponsoring site as a result of an ad click. In practice, click and clickthrough tend to be used interchangeably. A clickthrough, however, seems to imply that the user actually received the page. Some advertisers are willing to pay only for clickthroughs rather than for ad impressions.

Cost-per-action
Cost-per-action is what an advertiser pays for each visitor that takes some specifically defined action in response to an ad beyond simply clicking on it. For example, a visitor might visit an advertiser’s site and request to be subscribe to their newsletter.

Cost-per-lead
This is a more specific form of cost-per- action in which a visitor provides enough information at the advertiser’s site (or in interaction with a rich media ad) to be used as a sales lead.

Note that you can estimate cost-per-lead regardless of how you pay for the ad (in other words, buying on a pay-per-lead basis is not required to calculate the cost-per-lead).

Cost-per-sale
Sites that sell products directly from their Web site or can otherwise determine sales generated as the result of an advertising sales lead can calculate the cost-per-sale of Web advertising.

CPA
Cost-per-action is what an advertiser pays for each visitor that takes some specifically defined action in response to an ad beyond simply clicking on it. For example, a visitor might visit an advertiser’s site and request to be subscribe to their newsletter.

CPM
CPM is “cost per thousand” – a standard measure used to compare the relative cost of available media. CPM is the cost of delivering 1,000 ad impressions and is an industry standard measure for selling ads on Web sites.

This measure is taken from print advertising. The “M” has nothing to do with “mega” or million. It’s taken from the Roman numeral for “thousand.”

CPS
Sites that sell products directly from their Web site or can otherwise determine sales generated as the result of an advertising sales lead can calculate the cost-per-sale of Web advertising.

CPTM
CPTM is “cost per thousand targeted” ad impressions, apparently implying that the audience you’re selling is targeted to particular demographics.

Keyword Tool
Keyword suggestion tools can assist advertisers in identifying frequently-used and relevant keywords for their listings.

Minimum account
The minimum amount required to establish a bidding account. Typically, the bidding account is debited each time someone clicks on an account’s listing and visits the corresponding web page.

Minimum Bid
The minimum amount required to bid on each keyword.

Pay-per-call
This is a similar concept as pay-per-click (PPC) which is Google’s preferred income method. In pay-per-call however the advertiser receives a phone call usually initiated through a web form. Pay-per-call offers less vulnerability to fraud as the provider can block associated phone numbers.

Pay-per-click
In pay-per-click advertising, the advertiser pays a certain amount for each click through to the advertiser’s Web site. The amount paid per clickthrough is arranged at the time of the insertion order and varies considerably. Higher pay-per-click rates recognize that there may be some “no-click” branding value as well as clickthrough value provided.

Pay-per-lead
In pay-per-lead advertising, the advertiser pays for each sales lead generated. For example, an advertiser might pay for every visitor that clicked on a site and then filled out a form.

Pay-per-sale
Pay-per-sale is not customarily used for ad buys. It is, however, the customary way to pay Web sites that participate in affiliate programs, such as those of Amazon.com and Beyond.com.

Pay-per-view
Since this is the prevalent type of ad buying arrangement at larger Web sites, this term tends to be used only when comparing this most prevalent method with pay-per-click and other methods.

Real Time Listings
Listings are either updated immediately or are subject to editorial review. Immediate listing updates are more convenient for advertisers, but editorial review may tend toward more relevant search results and better written listings.

Search Results
The quality, relevance, and uniqueness of search result listings.

Search Speed
Search results display speed. Surfers gravitate to faster search engines.

Sorted Keywords
Keywords are often listed alphabetically to facilitate editing keywords and bids.

URLs per Account
The number of URL listings per account. Most allow multiple listings.

Now that you understand more about what search engine optimization (SEO) is, you can start looking at your website from a more analytic perspective.  B Line Marketing looks at your website’s strengths and weaknesses to create an individualized and personalized plan to use search engine optimization to meet your goals and objectives.

Email Marketing Terms:

Opt-in E-mail
Opt-in e-mail is e-mail containing information or advertising that users explicitly request (opt) to receive. Typically, a Web site invites its visitors to fill out forms identifying subject or product categories that interest them and about which they are willing to receive e-mail from anyone who might send it.

The Web site sells the names (with explicit or implicit permission from their visitors) to a company that specializes in collecting mailing lists that represent different interests. Whenever the mailing list company sells its lists to advertisers, the Web site is paid a small amount for each name that it generated for the list.

You can identify opt-in e-mail because it usually starts with a statement that tells you that you have previously agreed to receive such messages.

Opt-in e-mailing
A term popular in newsgroups and e-mail. You can request to receive e-mails on a certain subject. Some of these lists get their e-mails by offering the requester a chance to win something; others just want targeted information sent to them by e-mail.

Link Building Terms:

Affiliate Marketing
Affiliate marketing is the use by a Web site that sells products of other Web sites, called affiliates, to help market the products. Amazon.com, the book seller, created the first large-scale affiliate program and hundreds of other companies have followed since.

Co-branding

Co-branding on the Web often means two Web sites or Web site sections or features displaying their logos (and thus their brands) together so that the viewer considers the site or feature to be a joint enterprise. (Co-branding is often associated with cross-linking between the sites, although it isn’t necessary).

Link
A component of a hypertext document which when clicked with a mouse takes the user to another document or a different section of the current document. The word “mouse” above in this paragraph – which you can probably see in mauve or blue is an example of a link.

Listing
The individual web sites that appear for a search engine or directory query. When a keyword or keyword phrase is typed into a search engine or directory, the results that are displayed are often referred to as listings.

We aim to place all of our clients at the top of these listings.

Manual Submissions
Manual submissions means going to selected search engines/ directories and manually filling out online forms to submit to the engine for indexing and possible inclusion.

Sponsor
Depending on the context, a sponsor simply means an advertiser who has sponsored an ad and, by doing so, has also helped sponsor or sustain the Web site itself.

It can also mean an advertiser that has a special relationship with the Web site and supports a special feature of a Web site, such as a writer’s column, a Flower-of-the- Day, or a collection of articles on a particular subject.

Sponsorship
Sponsorship is an association with a Web site in some way that gives an advertiser some particular visibility and advantage above that of run-of-site advertising.

When associated with specific content, sponsorship can provide a more targeted audience than run-of-site ad buys. Sponsorship also implies a “synergy and resonance” between the Web site and the advertiser. Some sponsorships are available as value-added opportunities for advertisers who buy a certain minimum amount of advertising.

Strategic Linking

Business networking online to exchange free or paid listings with other web sites with your target audience. We do this by visiting and contacting their web site and sending them an invitation to visit your web site to see if they are interested. Most sites have a links page to place their various links. These sites have a link to your web site and you will have a link to theirs.

Linking increases web site popularity or how many other web sites which have a link to yours, which in turn increases your rankings on most of the search engines. It gets factored in their mathematical algorithms to yield higher positioning.

Social Media Marketing Terms:

Podcast
This is the method of distributing multimedia files, such as audio programs or music videos, over the Internet for playback on mobile devices and personal computers. Podcasts are distributed using either the RSS or Atom syndication formats.

Like the term “radio”, this term can mean both the content and the method of delivery. The host or author of a podcast is often referred to as a “podcaster”. Podcasters’ web sites may also offer direct download or streaming of their files. However, a podcast is distinguished by its ability to be downloaded automatically using software capable of reading RSS or Atom feeds. One can listen to a podcast either on a computer or on a mobile audio device (such as an iPod).

An example of an informative internet marketing podcast is www.EMarketingTalkShow.com.

Weblog
A weblog is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles, most often in reverse chronological order. Early weblogs were simply manually updated components of common web sites. However, the evolution of tools to facilitate the production and maintenance of web articles posted in said chronological fashion made the publishing process feasible to a much larger, less technical, population. Ultimately, this resulted in the distinct class of online publishing that produces blogs we recognize today. For instance, the use of some sort of browser based software is now a typical aspect of “blogging”.

The Internet Advertising Bureau is an industry collective that promotes cooperation and the self-regulation of advertising on the Internet. The IAB has identified a number of recommended banner sizes that almost all advertisers adhere to. It is one of several groups that are part of the industry coalition, FAST.

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