You are here: Home » Buzz Word » SEO » How Website Speed Effects Google Page Rank

How Website Speed Effects Google Page Rank

by admin on June 21, 2010

How Your Website Speed Effecting Your Google Page Rank

  1. Site speed is now a ranking factor in Google’s algorithm.  Why does page speed matter?  Other than the simple fact that internet users prefer faster pages, Google did an experiment of its own.  It slowed down Google.com to measure the impact on search behavior and found that slowing the site by 100-400 milliseconds (less than half a second) decreased the number of page users up to .6%.


How site speed affects rankings and things to keep in mind:

  1. Users are more likely to abandon pages that take longer to load.
  2. Viewers who feel that the site takes too long to load pages feel less satisfied with the site as a whole and are less likely to return to it.
  3. Viewers who click a link to continue to another page on the site are more likely to abandon the page before it finishes loading if they feel that it takes too long.  Keep users engaged with your site by increasing speed.
  4. Slower sites may find themselves slipping in SERPs, lower page ranks means lower SERP rankings also.
  5. A website’s home page is generally has the highest rank out of all the site’s pages.  If the homepage takes a long time to load (because of Flash, page size, etc.) the entire website’s ranking may decrease as a whole.
  6. Increasing site speed can mean decreasing costs.  Increasing site speed by decreasing bandwidth means you’ll be paying less.
  7. Sites may want to consider posting videos instead of hosting them, hosting means longer page load times.  Using YouTube to embed videos is an easy solution.
  8. Faster sites are more easily indexed by Google; this can help improve your SERP ranking.
  9. Page speed is a factor in the search ad AdWords quality score and it may become a factor in the organic ranking algorithm.
  10. It’s good to keep in mind though that less than 1% of queries are currently affected by Google now taking site speed in to ranking consideration.  Don’t sacrifice site quality for speed increases!

Ways to improve site speed:

  1. Know when to use GIF, JPG, PNG
    • GIF is suitable for images with few colors like logos, text & line art. When saving a GIF file, make sure you use a small color pallette.
    • JPG is good for images with lots of colors & details like photographs. Decrease the quality of a JPG image before saving. It will still look good for a web image.
    • PNG, a format especially for websites, has great quality – both transparent & non-transparent – is specially functional when you’re in need of quality transparent images. Don’t forget that IE6 has problems in displaying them.
  2. Be smart about CSS and compressing.
    • Mention every style in CSS files.
    • Find the common properties in objects, define them once & try not to repeat them.
    • If using a significant amount of totally different properties for a specific page, define them in another CSS file & only include on that page. So users viewing other pages won’t need to download those properties.
    • Compress your CSS file.
  3. Merge and compress JavaScript files.
    • Try merging JavaScript files prevent multiple includes.
    • If a JavaScript file will be used only in few pages, try to include them inside those pages only.
    • Compress JavaScript files. It lowers the size and doesn’t have any negative effects on your side.
  4. Better management of included files.
    • There may be several files included in web pages like CSS files, JavaScript files and other JavaScript files for statistic services, social bookmarking sites, and widgets.  Try to decrease the number of these files.
    • Use only 1 statistic service if possible. Every web-based service requires new files to be installed and they are called each time a page is loaded.
    • Host files on your side and don’t use web addresses as file paths.
    • If you’re using any JS frameworks like jQuery or MooTools, don’t call the .js files from their websites, download and upload them to your site.
    • Seperate the static & dynamic content. This will help writing less-code.
    • Create smart & effective functions.
    • Connect to the database as little as possible and once connected call only the data you need.
    • Try to keep database sizes small.
    • Don’t try to call any file from a web address like “http://..” because this always requires dns queries to be done.
    • PHP Speedy is a very effective solution that does all the combining and compressing automatically.
  5. Use HTTP Compression
    • HTTP compression: a feature of the web server (can be enabled on the server side)
    • Gzip: can be enabled at the site level.
    • This is for websites that don’t use ready-to-use systems like WordPress.
    • The dynamic coding of the website directly effects the performance.
  6. Better Coding
    1. This is for websites that don’t use ready-to-use systems like WordPress.
    2. The dynamic coding of the website directly effects the performance.
    3. Seperate the static & dynamic content. This will help writing less-code.

    4. Create smart & effective functions.

    5. Connect to the database as little as possible and once connected call only the data you need.

    6. Try to keep database sizes small.

  7. Cache Webpages
  8. For CMS applications like WordPress, there are already ready-to-use caching plugins (like WP-Cache).

Website speed is an important factor in your website’s page rank, but remember that all other elements of optimization and marketing are also important.  While it is important to improve overall speed, don’t take Google’s statistics too literally.  Quality is often times more important than quantity so don’t sacrifice the quality of your website just to improve its speed.

    1. This is for websites that don’t use ready-to-use systems like WordPress.
    2. The dynamic coding of the website directly effects the performance.

i. Seperate the static & dynamic content. This will help writing less-code.

ii. Create smart & effective functions.

iii. Connect to the database as little as possible and once connected call only the data you need.

iv. Try to keep database sizes small.

  1. Cache Webpages
    1. For CMS applications like WordPress, there are already ready-to-use caching plugins (like WP-Cache).

{ 3 comments }

lebedev July 14, 2010 at 12:09 am

This was very interesting to read. I want to quote your post in my blog. My I? And do you have an account on Twitter?

sanyared July 30, 2010 at 5:41 pm

It was very interesting to read http://www.blinemarketing.com, I want to quote your post in my blog. May I? And do you have an account on Twitter?

Online CNA Classes August 4, 2010 at 1:45 am

What a great resource!

Comments on this entry are closed.

{ 1 trackback }

Previous post:

Next post:

Socialize

 

Affiliates

Twitter Linked In
Facebook flickr

 

Google AdWords Google Analytics SEO Code of Ethics San Francisco Chamber of Commerce
Google AdWords BBB - Better Business Bureau Google AdWords UBC
Schedule a consultation